Breastfeeding Information

Does Your Older Baby Still Need Night Feedings?

Has somebody told you that your baby doesn’t need to breastfeed at night past a certain age? This age often varies by advisor. However, science tells us that in many cases, this simply isn’t true.

Hand Expression

 
 
Hand expression is a useful skill for any nursing mother.  It can relieve breast fullness, stimulate milk production, and provide milk for your baby.

Getting Ready
First wash your hands well. Find a clean collection container with a wide mouth, like a cup. Or, you can express your milk into a spoon and feed it directly to the baby. Whenever possible, plan to express in a private, comfortable place where you can relax. Feeling relaxed enhances milk flow.

Breastfeeding Your Adopted Baby

Yes, you can breastfeed a baby to whom you did not give birth. In fact, breastfeeding an adopted baby is recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics. It is even possible to breastfeed if you have never been pregnant or have reached menopause. Breastfeeding an adopted baby is different than breastfeeding a baby after being pregnant, but it can be achieved through the process of induced lactation.

How can I tell if my baby is full?

Satiety cues are your baby’s way of showing he is satisfied and no longer hungry. Here are a few cues you might recognize at the end of breastfeeding:

  • Baby’s hands are open and relaxed
  • Baby’s body feels relaxed, “loose”
  • Baby may have hiccups but is calm and relaxed
  • Baby may fall asleep
  • Baby may have a “wet burp” (milk can be seen dribbling out mouth)
  • Baby seems peaceful

What Does Evidence-Based Mean?

Part of the mission of Breastfeeding USA is to provide evidence-based information. What does that statement mean? What is evidence? In the strictest sense, it is information that is backed by solid, peer-reviewed research based on established scientific principles. For a very long time, there was little strong empirical evidence related to breastfeeding, and most of the existing research was concerned with the components of breastmilk. Thankfully, there is now a growing body of research on many aspects of breastfeeding. Sometimes, the results affirm what we already suspected to be true, and sometimes they are surprising.

Thinking About Weaning?

NOTE: This is the third and final article in a series about weaning.
Depending on where you live, “weaning” may mean either introducing other foods or stopping breastfeeding. In this article, we are talking about weaning from the breast.

Good Foods for Babies

NOTE: This article is the second of a series about introducing solids and weaning. You may want to read the previous article first: When is the Best Time to Start My Baby on Foods Other Than Breastmilk? The final article in this series is: Thinking About Weaning?

When is the Best Time to Start My Baby on Foods Other Than Breastmilk?

NOTE: This article is the first of a series about introducing solids and weaning. The next articles in the series are:
Good Foods for Babies
Thinking About Weaning?

Disaster Preparedness: Breastfeeding Matters During an Emergency

One of the things that we can depend on, unfortunately, is that disasters and emergencies will continue to happen around the world. From tornadoes and hurricanes to earthquakes and floods to the effects of war, few people are immune to the possibility of dealing with at least one or more of these situations sometime in their lifetime. During a disaster or emergency, breastfeeding becomes even more important and has been proven to save lives.

The American Academy of Pediatrics states:

Nipple Shield: Friend or Foe?

I recently spoke to a mother whose 1-month-old baby was born 4 weeks preterm. She was breastfeeding with a nipple shield, which she was given in the hospital, and she was confused by conflicting advice. Should she pump after feedings? Was her baby getting enough milk? How should she wean from the shield? This was her sixth breastfeeding baby but her first preterm baby and first time using a shield. She was emotional and unsure of herself. My answers below were based on the research described in my book, Breastfeeding Answers Made Simple.